Counterfeit grace

False grace and those who peddle it are much the same as counterfeit money. Counterfeiters and those who are willing to risk trafficking in counterfeit money do it for much the same reason that false prophets prophesy falsely. False grace is unauthorized. Those who apply it do so with no authorization from God, because they reject God’s economy.

The preaching of the true prophets was a means by which God gave grace to His people Israel—but they would rather have the counterfeit. They would rather have the ‘peace, peace’; they would not listen to the prophets; and so God says at the end of chapter 5, “But what will you do at the end of it?” What will the result be? When the day of reckoning arrives, what will one holding to such a false hope face?

Over half a century ago Dietrich Bonhoeffer warned about “cheap grace”, but still today the counterfeit stuff is floating around in our churches–and it is just as worthless as ever.

In a sermon titled Cheap Grace from the 2009 ClearNote Fellowship Conference, Pastor David “Max” Curell helps us see some basic things about counterfeit grace. Brother, is the grace you’re holding onto the real thing? Read or listen to Pastor Curell’s sermon (audio and transcript below) and examine yourself. You sure don’t want to be found holding the fake stuff on that Day.

(This is sermon 3 in a series; see also sermon 1, sermon 2, and sermon 4.)

Outline

Authentic money

  1. Printed and circulated by the will of a government
  2. Its value is (theoretically) guaranteed by something that the government holds, that the government has
  3. Private individuals may hold it, but the authentic currency is never fully removed from the influence and identification with the nation that it represents
  4. When we hold it, we become familiar with its authentic feel

Authentic grace

  1. Authentic grace originates with God
  2. God’s grace is valued by the blood of Jesus
  3. God gives His grace by His means and for His purposes
  4. When we experience God’s grace, we become familiar with it, we recognize the evidence of its authenticity

Counterfeit money

  1. No government authorized its printing and distribution
  2. Its value is not guaranteed against anything
  3. I can hold it in my hand, but the government really has no influence over it or identification with it while I’m holding it
  4. Unless you’re a foreigner or a child, you ought to know that this isn’t real money

Why would somebody want to traffic in counterfeit money?

  1. It’s easy to get
  2. You can enrich yourselves for nothing
  3. But you don’t want to be the one left holding the bill

Counterfeit grace
False benedictions, empty blessings
Paul
Two characteristics of false grace
No connection to God
Worthless
Application
Pastors love the counterfeit
People love the counterfeit
But what will you do at the end of it?

Authentic money

I want to tell a fish story this morning, to start off. It’s a favorite story I have about observation. There was a class where they were dealing with dissection, and so all the students came in and the professor had little trays on their study tables in front of them, and on the tray was a fish. And so they were instructed when they came in that they were to make observations about the fish and they were to work all day long by pouring alcohol to keep the fish moist so that it would not be smelly—holding onto the fish while they observed it.

And so all day long, people were making observations about the fish—it was quite a long session—and the professor kept saying, look, you haven’t even seen anything yet, you haven’t even seen anything yet. Keep looking, keep looking. So they keep making observations: Well, it has gills; it has eyes; it has scales; it’s got this kind of greenish-blue shimmering color; it has a tail. On and on and on, observations, observations, observations; the professor says, “You haven’t seen anything. Nobody’s seen anything!”

So finally one guy in the class (he’s been looking and looking and looking at the fish, you know, you’re tired of looking at the fish) says, “The fish is symmetrical?”

And then the professor says, “Finally, somebody saw something!”

I’m kind of wired to think about things like that, I just kind of think about something on and on and on, and then I see something in it that’s just very obvious (except for when my wife gets her hair cut—then the only thing that’s obvious is the expression on her face that tells me that I didn’t notice something, you know.)

But I want us to make some observations about grace this morning, and I want us to start off by looking at something that I have in my hand, which is a wad of money. Now don’t be deceived, they’re all $1 bills, this is my daughters’ allowance that I’m holding (My daughters‘, plural, lest you think my daughter gets that many $1 bills.)

This is a stack of money, and I want us to observe something about it this morning. I don’t want us to observe the color or the shape or those kinds of things particularly, but I want us to observe and think about the nature of currency.

So what do we know about money? Well money, if it’s authentic, its printing and circulation is authorized by a nation, by the will of the government.

What else do we know about money? Well, we know that its value is (theoretically) guaranteed by something that the government holds, that the government has.

Another thing we know about money is that private individuals or citizens may hold it, just like I’m holding this money, but the authentic currency is really never removed fully from the influence and identification with the nation that it represents. It’s never fully removed from the influence and the representation of the nation that it represents—what’s it say on my money? “The United States of America.” And what can the government do that affects my money even while I’m holding it in my hands? This money is probably inflating even while I’m holding in my hand. It was $24, it might be $23 by the time I get done speaking, right? (Even though there’ll be still 24 of them in my hand.)

Another thing that’s true about money is that when we hold it we become familiar with its authentic feel, we understand its value. We know whether or not we should trust it, generally. Now it’s not true of maybe children or foreigners. You know, you offer a child a shiny, bright silver dollar or five nickels and they might jump at the five nickels, or you might offer them five slugs that you pulled out of the electric box and they might jump at the five slugs because there’s five. Foreigners may not understand our money—when I go to Mexico, I’m not really sure when I’m getting my change back that I’m getting authentic Mexican money, because, let’s face it, I don’t know how they keep up with it. Thirty, forty colors, shapes, sizes—it’s really different. But generally we know it. We’re familiar with it.

And there are some things that are true of authentic grace that we are familiar with, that we know to be true. And I want us to compare them with the observations that I’ve proposed to you today about money.

Authentic grace

Authentic grace—and this may just be an obvious thing that you hadn’t thought of—authentic grace originates with God. It belongs to God. He distributes it through His means, as He wills, for His purpose. Have you ever stopped to think about grace not being from you? But it’s actually from God. It seems simple, doesn’t it? But the reality is, as you’re going to see, it’s a significant thing that authentic grace comes from God.

Romans 10 says, “the same Lord is Lord of all, abounding in riches for all”. They’re God’s riches. And then it talks about how God plans to give His riches—particularly the gospel—to His people, and it says that they get the gospel by believing and that they believe because they hear and that they hear because somebody preaches it to them. And so it comes by God’s means. The preacher’s feet are called beautiful, because he brings as the means of God’s grace the preaching of the Word, the gospel.

In Titus 2 it says,

the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all men, instructing us to deny ungodliness

And it says it appeared and He gave it to us

to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession, zealous for good deeds.

He has an economy. He has something that He set up. It’s His grace, He exercises it by His means for His purposes.

God’s grace has value.

John 1 verse 17 says,

the Law was given through Moses; grace and truth were realized through Jesus Christ.

And if you go to the Scriptures, you can see the sacrifice that Jesus made, the precious value of His blood as He sacrificed Himself for us and purchased redemption for us, so that God could apply His grace to us.

God’s grace has incredible value, because it’s valued against Jesus. It’s valued against the holy, incarnate Son of God. It’s valuable.

While God may give His grace to men, it’s never removed from His influence and identification. He says that His gifts come from Him—they’re not from our works, they’re from Him—and that He gave them to us and actually recreated us in Jesus Christ so that we would do good works that He prepared beforehand that we should do. So as He gives us His gifts and His grace, it’s supposed to produce something that He desires, and it is for His glory, so that men will look at Him and say, “Wow! God is amazing!” It’s never really removed from Him, from His influence.

And when we hold on to God’s grace, when we experience God’s grace, we have a familiarity with it, we recognize that it’s authentic. We recognize it because we’re familiar with the means of its distribution and the evidence of its work. When we hear true preaching we say, “Yes.” God’s grace coming to us. When we take the sacrament, “Yes.” God’s grace coming to us. We know the evidence because His grace instructs us to deny ungodliness and worldly desires. We know the evidence because Jesus says, “If anyone wishes to come after me he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.” We know the evidence of God’s grace because Paul says that he was made a steward of God’s grace so that it was the official, authentic grace of God that he was delivering and preaching to the people the gospel.

We know the evidence of God’s grace because God says, Look, you don’t get My grace and then continue to sin just because I’m giving you grace, in Romans 6. And if you read that whole chapter, you see the work of God’s grace in sanctification, in discipleship, in following Him—it’s authentic, we recognize it. We recognize the life of obedience that goes along with God’s grace that’s authentic; we become familiar with God’s economy.

Now we might not expect our children to have a real familiarity with what’s authentic—what’s truly God’s grace—and what’s cheap grace. We might not expect unbelievers to have any understanding of God’s grace, whether it’s true grace or cheap grace. But believers who have been given the truth of Jesus Christ in the means that God has provided for it, by the power of His Holy Spirit have familiarity with the grace of God. We understand things about the grace of God.

Counterfeit money

Here is another stack of money. You’re going to have to use your imagination a little bit, but I want to tell you that there are some hundred dollar bills in it. Now you might be able to make some immediate observations about it. One is that it’s the wrong color—the other is, I would never be carrying a wad of hundred dollar bills.

But let’s think about this stack of illegitimate, counterfeit bills. Why is it illegitimate? Well, because no government, particularly the one that’s printed on it, United States of America, no government authorized its printing and distribution. Its value is not guaranteed against anything. I can hold it in my hand, but the U.S. government really has no influence over it or identification with it while I’m holding it, they don’t care (unless I try to pass it off to somebody). And unless you’re a foreigner or a child, you ought to know that this isn’t real money. (A foreigner or a child might not—they might be very excited to get a hold of a hundred dollar bill.)

Why would somebody want to traffic in counterfeit money?

Why would somebody want to traffic in counterfeit money?

Well, since it doesn’t have any real value, you can acquire it without exchanging goods and services for it. So you can get it pretty easily. And after you’ve aqcuired it pretty easily, if you can pass it off on somebody, you can get goods and services and enrich yourselves for nothing, as long as no one notices that they’re being defrauded.

But illegitimate money isn’t desirable for most people. We’re not tempted to traffic in counterfeit money. Why? At a very basic level, the stakes are very high. And it could be that you could get by with passing off a few bills, but when the music stops playing, you don’t want to be the one holding the bill. When the music stops playing, you want the bill to be somewhere else.

Counterfeit grace

There’s a potential problem with the title and description of the session that I’m doing today called Cheap Grace—it might lead someone to understand that there’s a possibility of a kind of a heterodox form of grace, a variety of grace that’s just off but still within the bounds of acceptability. But for clarity, I want you to understand that cheap grace is counterfeit grace, identified by its lack of connection to God’s economy.

Well what do I mean by God’s economy? God’s economy is the means by which the Scriptures say that grace comes to us. Cheap grace is a proposed grace that is divorced from the means by which God has revealed that He gives His grace to His people. And so here I have a quote by Dietrich Bonhoeffer from The Cost of Discipleship,

Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, communion without confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ. Let him be comforted and rest assured in his possession of this grace, for grace alone does everything. Instead of following Christ, let the Christian enjoy the consolations of His grace. That is what we mean by cheap grace, the grace which amounts to the justification of sin without the justification of the repentant sinner who departs from sin and from whom sin departs. Cheap grace is not the kind of forgiveness of sin which frees us from the toils of sin. Cheap grace is the grace we bestow on ourselves.

Remember what I said. It’s a very basic point that grace is from God, that it originates in God, but unless you see that when we counterfeit grace and bestow it upon ourselves, you don’t see the contrast between the two–and you must see the contrast.

Cheap grace is false grace. Jeremiah 5:29,

‘Shall I not punish these people?’ declares the LORD,
‘On a nation such as this
Shall I not avenge Myself?’
An appalling and horrible thing
Has happened in the land:
The prophets prophesy falsely,
And the priests rule on their own authority…

…manufacture their own…

And My people love it so!
But what will you do at the end of it?

In the next chapter, Jeremiah 6, he says, verse 13,

from the least of them even to the greatest of them,
Everyone is greedy for gain,
And from the prophet even to the priest
Everyone deals falsely.
They have healed the brokenness of My people superficially,
Saying, ‘Peace, peace’

But I want you to substitute: Saying, ‘Grace, grace.’

They have healed the brokenness of My people superficially, saying, ‘Grace, grace,’ but there is no grace. There is no grace, because it’s not God’s.

“Were they ashamed because of the abomination they have done?
They were not even ashamed at all;
They did not even know how to blush.
Therefore they shall fall among those who fall;
At the time that I punish them,
They shall be cast down,” says the LORD.
Thus says the LORD, “Stand by the ways and see and ask for the ancient paths,
Where the good way is, and walk in it;
And you will find rest for your souls.
But they said, ‘We will not walk in it.’
And I set watchmen over you, saying,
‘Listen to the sound of the trumpet!’
But they said, ‘We will not listen.'”

False benedictions, empty blessings

The problem in these passages from Jeremiah is that the spiritual leaders, in order to enrich themselves, give false hope and false instruction, and as a result the people perish. Wait a minute, no. The problem in these passages from Jeremiah is that the people don’t want to hear the truth so they reward those who give them false hope and false instruction, and their ears are closed to the faithful watchmen.

Which is true? Both—both are true.

The preaching of the true prophets was a means by which God gave grace to His people Israel—but they would rather have the counterfeit. They would rather have the ‘peace, peace’; they would not listen to the prophets; and so God says at the end of chapter 5, “But what will you do at the end of it?” What will the result be? When the day of reckoning arrives, what will one holding to such a false hope face? This is the question that I want to discipline and haunt us when we are finished with this session.

We have the same situation prophesied in the New Testament, in 2 Timothy 4:1-5, Tim alluded to it earlier,

I solemnly charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by His appearing and His kingdom: preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort, with great patience and instruction. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but wanting to have their ears tickled, they will accumulate for themselves teachers in accordance to their own desires, and will turn away their ears from the truth and will turn aside to myths.

“Accumulate for themselves,” as Tim says—the word literally means they will heap them up in heaps. We have heaps and heaps of this around us. The evangelical church, the American church, is piles and piles and piles of ear-ticklers and doctrine rejecters.

False grace and those who peddle it are much the same as counterfeit money. Counterfeiters and those who are willing to risk trafficking in counterfeit money do it for much the same reason that false prophets prophesy falsely. False grace is unauthorized. Those who apply it do so with no authorization from God, because they reject God’s economy.

If you read the epistles in the New Testament, you will see grace used as a benediction, as a blessing, about 33 times. Grace to you, grace and peace to you, the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with you. Sound familiar? We give a benediction typically on Sunday morning at the end of every service. It’s very appropriate to give a blessing, to give a benediction.

But what you have to realize is that in all those epistles, between the benediction and blessing at the beginning and the benediction and blessing at the end there are pages of instruction on what that grace is, and how it is distributed and where it comes from and how we recognize it to be true and how we apply ourselves to receiving it, and the cross that bought it for us, and the cross that we must carry as God continues to pour it on us, in obedience and discipleship to Jesus Christ. That’s what between the blessing at the beginning and the blessing at the end.

But what we’ve come to do in America and in the churches and in evangelical churches—we’ve decided that all grace is is a benediction. That’s all it is, it’s cheap! We can do that: bless you! Grace to you! Grace to you! Grace to you. Grace, grace. It’s a mantra: “Grace, grace, grace, grace, grace, grace, grace…”—and it’s devoid of the economy of God. It’s counterfeit, it’s wicked, it’s empty. It’s unauthorized.

Here’s a quote from a man who has a smile much like Dr. Seuss’s grinch—can you picture the smile?

…the church must be willing to die as a church and be born again as a mission. We cannot speak out with a “Thus saith the Lord” strategy when we are talking to people who couldn’t care less about the Lord. We cannot start with “What does the text say?” if we’re talking to persons who aren’t about to affirm respect for or unquestioning obeisance to “the text.”

I was called to start a mission, not a church. There is a difference…You don’t try to preach…what is sin and what isn’t sin. A mission is a place where you ask nonbelievers to come and find faith and hope and feel love. We’re a mission first, a church second.

A place where nonbelievers can find faith, hope and love with no exposure to God, the God who gives them? No exposure to the means by which He gives them? Grace, grace, grace, grace, grace, grace, benediction. Blessing. Empty. Robert Schuller.

Another quote:

“A martyr is someone who testifies to the good that’s around them all the time.”

“We interrupt your guilt with grace and peace.”

“Grace and peace will change the world.”

“Divisive things aren’t of the Spirit.”

No abhorrence of sin, no call to repentance, nothing negative. Only a benediction, and a side-handed curse on anyone who brings up the means of grace in God’s economy. Rob Bell. They’re playing his tapes in all your Christian schools, at all your university clubs and campus clubs, in half the churches in the country. They’re playing his tapes and filling the minds of the people with counterfeit grace.

Martin Luther says,

It follows that if we preach the forgiveness of sins without repentance that the people imagine that they have already obtained the forgiveness of sins, becoming thereby secure and without compunction of conscience. This would be a greater error and sin than all the errors hitherto prevailing.

To say ‘Peace, peace,’ when there is no peace.

Another quote about being missional: We should

engage the culture with gentle, self-deprecating but joyful irony that the gospel creates.

Paul

Now I want you to go with me to Athens and Paul standing there among the Athenians as he is “engaging the culture with the gentle, self-deprecating but joyful irony that the gospel creates.” Ok? Paul:

“I’m not sure about this, but it seems ironic that you thought you were wise when actually you were ignorant. Oh yeah, I almost forgot. Repent, because God who raised Jesus from the dead is coming to judge you!”

Tim already quoted that man to you this morning. That man also said that the defeater of the gospel in the non-Christian West is, is that we are charged with intolerance.

I have to tell you something. What defeats the gospel in the non-Christian West is not that we are saddled with the label of intolerance. What defeats the gospel in the non-Christian West is that no one preaches it.

We don’t need empty benedictions, false benedictions, we need aggressive proclamations of God’s truth calling people to repentance. This is what Tim was talking about this morning. This is what Stephen was talking about last night when he was talking about the destroying of speculations and the tearing down of strongholds and the taking of every thought captive in obedience to Christ.

Two characteristics of false grace

False grace does not originate in God, and false grace has no value. It does nothing. The healing that it does is zero. If you read Calvin about this, if you read Spurgeon about this, they talk about these prophets and how wicked they are because they’re afraid to do the work of probing into the wound to deal with what’s under the surface, and so the healing that they propose is an empty, a blank healing. It is no healing at all.

No connection to God

False grace has no connection to God. The prophets that prophesy did not prophesy in His name. Look at Jeremiah 5, he says in verse 12,

They have lied about the LORD And said, “…Misfortune will not come on us…we will not see sword or famine.

And he says,

“The prophets are as wind,
And the word is not in them.
Thus it will be done to them!”
Therefore, thus says the LORD, the God of hosts,
“Because you have spoken this word,
Behold, I am making My words in your mouth fire
And this people wood, and it will consume them.

Worthless

And unless you’re a foreigner or a child, you should know that counterfeit grace is worthless.

Hebrews 5 says that those who have become mature are able to have solid food because they have practiced and their senses are trained to be able to discern good from evil.

1 Peter chapter 1, he talks about the proof of our faith being more precious than gold, and that is that they have gone through and been tested by fire through various trials. He goes on to talk about the prophets who prophesied about the grace to come in Jesus Christ. And how Jesus came and brought that grace, fulfilling what the prophets had said. And how He suffered and died on the cross. And he says,

prepare your minds for action, keep sober in spirit, fix your hope completely on the grace to be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ…Do not be conformed to the former lusts which were yours in your ignorance, but be

holy,

like the Holy One who called you

Application

Pastors love the counterfeit

So why do pastors want to give the counterfeit stuff? Well, the real stuff is costly, and it’s painful. We get beat up if we give out the real stuff, Tim was talking about that this morning. And also it requires courage to inflict the treatment required to actually see someone spiritually healed, because you have to probe into the wound, you have to reset the bone.

My son broke his leg when he was eight—spiral fracture, we took him to the hospital. I could feel the bone kind of ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk in there. We went back into the X-ray room. What did the X-ray technician do? Ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk, lined it up, my son says “Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!” Went into the treatment room. What did the doctor do? ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk-ckk, my son’s “Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!” I’m “Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!” My wife’s in the hall. Wrap it all up, set it. Being set inside that causes muscles to flare up, and he had these cramps in his muscles and he’d go, “Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!” till it all settled down. But his bone healed, and he walks.

We don’t want to do that, we don’t like to see you scream, it’s not fun, it’s not pleasant—but we have a motivation. But it’s easy for us to be false, to be counterfeit. We can’t enrich ourselves with authentic preaching, really. Because typically when you’re preaching authentic grace, you’re offending the rich and powerful.

People love the counterfeit

Why do you and I love the counterfeit? Well we love the counterfeit because we like the cheap stuff. We don’t want to hear about our sin, we don’t want to hear about depravity. We don’t want to confess our sin, we want to use clean, clinical words: we want to say we made a mistake, we want to say we messed up, we want to say, “My bad! Oops! Oopsy there!” We don’t want to repent. We don’t want to know the holy God, or His Son, or His Spirit. We don’t want to consider the cross of Christ. We certainly don’t want to pick up any cross with our name on it, to follow Him. And we go through great lengths, everything that we can do, to avoid it.

I want to read to you very briefly the points of Charles Spurgeon’s sermon about how we avoid the authentic grace that God provides. The sermon is entitled, “A Blast of the Trumpet Against False Peace.” Spurgeon says these are the methods we use to avoid the truth of God and His grace, his economy.

He says we medicate everything with entertainment. If I can fill my mind with enough things that I don’t have to think about God’s economy and the realities of what comes between the first blessing in the epistle and the second blessing in the epistle, I’m fine, I feel good, I’m pacified.

Secondly he says we suppress the truth, we just hold it down, we say no. He calls this the work of the infidel. We say it doesn’t apply because it’s not true.

Third he says we deny it. We just say well, no, we’ll just live and let live—can’t we just all get along? You believe what you believe, I’ll believe what I want to believe—but we deny the reality of a true economy of God, and we hold it at bay with our denial.

Four, we procrastinate. We say, well you know what, I’ll get serious about God’s grace as soon as I finish this work at school, as soon as I finish my degree, as soon as I finish building my house, as soon as I get married, as soon as we have a couple kids, soon as we have our finances in order, then I’ll go from the counterfeit and start working with the real stuff. We procrastinate.

Five, we cultivate ignorance—or maybe it’s uncultivated. It’s all around us, the ignorance of the truth of God. Tim says we don’t tell people because we don’t love them.

Six, we reject discipline. It’s another place where we look at the parts in the middle of the epistles and we say, I don’t want to deal with those parts, and those are the parts that deal with discipline, so we just reject discipline and write it off.

And seven and very seriously, Spurgeon says, then there are those who have just spurned God so long it seems obvious that they are reprobate—that even if they could turn and plead for the economy of God to be part of their lives, God has said I’ve toiled with you long enough. It’s a sober, sober warning.

And I encourage you to read the entire sermon, The Blast of the Trumpet Against False Peace.

We have heaped up teachers in accordance with our own desires, filling our ears and minds with benedictions. “Go and be victorious.” Our leaders have fashioned iron horns and they’ve run in front of us and said, “With these horns you will gore poverty and sickness, and you will strike discomfort and it will fall.” And it’s all a lie.

But what will you do at the end of it?

But there’s a Day coming when the music is going to stop. And we and our children and our families and our neighbors and our fellow church members, we’re all going to stand before a holy God, before Jesus Christ, and are we going to hold out counterfeit bills and say, “Lord, Lord!”?

You know what He’ll say if we do that. You know what He’ll say if our children do it, you know what He’ll say if our neighbors do it, you know what He’ll say if our mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters do it. You know what He’ll say if the people in the seats next to you stand up in front of Jesus Christ on that Day and hold up counterfeit bills and say, “I have your grace!” You know what He’ll say. I know what He’ll say.

Let it be branded in our minds and in our hearts. We don’t want Him to say, “Depart from Me; I never knew you.” We want them to come to Him having known the grace of God, and when they stand before Him and say, “Jesus, my Savior,” He’ll say, “Come, blessed of my Father.” That’s what we desire. But it’s not going to happen with cheap grace.

Let’s pray.

Heavenly Father, we have sinned—I have sinned, because of my own fears, my own desire for comfort, my own lack of faith, I have given cheap grace. Lord, we have given cheap grace. We have not loved You as we ought, we have not loved our neighbors as we ought. It’s a wicked thing we have done, Father. Will You forgive us because of Jesus. Will You be merciful to us this morning. Will You turn our hearts to what is true, what is authentic, and cause us to love only that which is good and of You. Would you make us sick at our stomach at anything false, at anything counterfeit. Would you sanctify us by Your Holy Spirit. Please, will You give us Your Spirit, Father. You are good to us. Lord, apply Your balm to our hearts. Heal us, Lord, deeply, with Your truth and Your mercy. Remove our sin from us as far as the east is from the west. Create in us a clean heart, and renew a right spirit within us. Give us another opportunity, Father. Give us opportunity to declare You and to testify to You, to confess You before men, and then give us the strength to do it. Thank you, Father. We pray this in the name of Jesus, amen.

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2 Responses to Counterfeit grace

  1. Sandy says:

    Thank you for this sermon. In a world where so many are being misled it is wonderful to know that there are still those that are preaching the truth.
    Sandy

  2. This message should be proclaimed in every church around the world. Great job! Thank you for posting. The angels of heaven rejoice over every sinner that repents!

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